Violin Lessons

I know that reading is going to be a great solace for me as Coronavirus forces us to spend more time at home. I have done several book reviews on the More to the story website blog and I plan to do others as I am forced to spend time alone which is good thinking and writing time for me.

If you are looking for something different to read I hope you will find my book reviews helpful.  Arnold Zable, one of my favourite Australian writers, has just released a new book called The Watermill.  I have just bought it from my local bookstore and it is readily available from on-line book sellers.

This review however is of an earlier work from Zable – a collection of short stories called Violin Lessons. It is a favourite of mine because it explores displacement and exile in different times and settings including stories from the Jewish refugee experience through to the Greek and other European immigrant experience.   A young boy plays the violin for his mother in Melbourne. Nina Simone sings ‘Pirate Jenny’ in a bar in Berlin. A fisherman plays a flute on the Mekong. And the strains of Paganini resonate in the forests of eastern Poland. From the cabarets of 1940s Baghdad to the streets of war-torn Saigon and the canals and alleyways of present-day Venice, music weaves through each of these stories.

The Ancient Mariner, the longest story in the collection describes Amal’s journey to Australia by boat as an asylum seeker and the trauma that she suffered as she struggled to stay alive after her boat capsized. She was forced to hang onto a dead body to stay afloat waiting for help.

Zable met Amal recovering from the trauma of nearly drowning at sea and was with her years later at the time of her death from cancer. As a trusted friend he promised to write her story. Despite these two tragic events, this is a truly uplifting story and reminder of our shared humanity.

Zable writes of documenting her story. “Five years after her death I am fulfilling my promise. Yet each time I sit down to write, anxiety rises for fear I will not do the story justice, will not find the words to convey the terror and beauty of Amal’s telling…”

He finds the words; words so lyrical in the choosing that I have to read them several times for their beauty.  Zable is one of Australia’s great storytellers.   I hope you enjoy his work.

violin lessons