The Kabul Peace House

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world: indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.  

The words of Margaret Mead inspire the unlikely hero of this book, Afghan doctor Insaan, to establish a hopelessly idealistic project: to build and maintain a community of young Afghans devoted to the principle of non-violence.

Insaan has brought together a group of men and women with harrowing backgrounds from Afghanistan’s rival groups including Pashtuns, Tajiks, Hazaras and Uzbeks.  Usually fighting each other in a bitter tribal warfare that has torn Afghanistan apart for decades, the 40 young people start to build peaceful multiethnic communities. 

The Kabul Peace House is a book of fascinating opportunity by well-known writer and community worker Mark Isaacs.

To contrast this compelling story Isaacs also documents the depressing history of Afghanistan which has been wracked by war since the Soviet invasion of 1979.  This brutal conflict lasted ten years and was followed by years of civil war and then an invasion led by the US post 9/11 to defeat the Taliban.  While hope is shared among the young people of the Kubul Peace House it is hard not to feel a sense of déjà vu as the Taliban once again rise to take back power and feudal wars continue.

Isaac’s characters are large on the page including Hojar, a young woman making a new life for herself with education and Horse, a child shepherd supporting his family of eight. They and others risk their lives to join this radical experiment – a glimpse of what a new Afghanistan could look like. People come and go throughout the story as the Peace House moves from the mountains to other humble sets of premises.

Issacs starts his book with the following questions:

“What kind of world are we becoming when 65 million people do not have a safe place in their own countries?   What kind of world are we nurturing and accepting?”

If you are interested in discovering how small pockets of communities interested in peacebuilding not violence can make a difference, this is a book for you.

The Kabul Peace House reminds us that even in the most challenging times, hope, love, and peace can flourish.